The Godkiller Campaign

Call for Player Input

Hey guys,

I’m working on a new campaign and wanted to take a poll on preferences regarding style of play (roleplaying/combat ratio, high/low magic, metagaming, etc.) and preferences or interests in terms of what sort of story you’d like to play through. I know that I definitely get into mental spaces where I really want to play through a certain scenario, style of world (i.e.- apocalyptic, middle ages, renaissance) or character type, and that’s the sort of stuff I’m looking for from you all.

Without tipping my cards too much, the idea I’ve got going for the campaign starts out with pretty typical dungeon crawl investigation adventures, but could also include a fair bit of politcs if desired, and will almost certainly call for a bit of inter-planar travel. Lots of cults, demons, devils and some odds and ends in there to make it interesting.

Plot: So, for my first question, does this sound interesting to you? Is there an aspect of the game you’d like to have more of (Fey, underdark, war, espionage, whatever)? Is there anything here you don’t like?

Characters: What kind of character would you want to build and play? How do you envision yourself having the most fun playing that character? And on this one, we don’t have to stick strictly to the rules. I’m happy to work on developing a way to implement pretty much any crazy idea you’ve got. Want your character to be a poison master, but think all the game poisons suck? Want to be an Errol Flynn style pirate, sliding down drapes and swinging on chandeliers? Or, we can always get out the SpellJammer books…

Worldbuilding: any settings you want to explore, like dwarven cities/tombs, elven woodlands, goblin infested wastelands or…? Any world level ideas of this same type – great port cities, capitols, swamps, mountains, plains, wastelands, forests, islands? Any organizations or governments you’d like to explore – organized crime, adventuring archaeologists guild, monastic sects, monarchies, republics, theocracies, mageocracy? And finally real-world regional and historical simulacrums – Pirates/East India Company in the Carribean, Venice in the Middle Ages, England/Ireland/Scotland during England’s consolidation, same during England’s subjugation by the Irish, Japan pre-Industrialism, Japan post-Industrialism, west Asian (middle eastern) gulf cultures a la Arabian Nights, ancient Rome or Greece… I digress. There’s a lot we could do here, so I guess I’ll just see what you all suggest.

My personal preferences as the DM: While I thoroughly enjoy a good hack-n-slash session, it gets a little boring from behind the screen after a while. The thing I really love about D&D (and I guess roleplaying in general, but I’ve never played anything else) is the opportunity to create stories and be entertained. So, while DM’ing does imply a certain level of responsibility for directing the story, I’m really interested in getting a game going where I’m not the only one with input as to what will happen. That’s why I’m sending you all this email.

- I’d love to incorporate scenarios and settings that require a bit more roleplaying than Lonely Wizards generally engages in.
- I’d like to see magic be a little harder to find. Maybe not unavailable, just not available for sale in every marketplace. You’re going to have to hunt down the retired legendary blacksmith if you want that sweet sword.
- I’d also love to create a world that’s bigger than just the characters; So maybe you hear several rumors around town, follow up on one for your next adventure and when you get back to the bar you hear that there have been some significant developments in world affairs. This would involve creating at least a rudimentary world system with countries, factions and geography. This is something I’d love help with.

I guess essentially I’m looking for ways to get you guys invested in the setting and the campaign and maximize the amount of fun to be had.

Ok, I’ll end this long and extremely dorky email now.

Thanks,
Adam

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m8adam

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